Ghazal: Fences of Segregation

pole fence

Walking down the wooded lane, a fence, man’s separation,
I pondered of our need for a form of segregation.

Myth would have it that God punished disobedient humanity,
Exiled from our birthplace, closed off, in a form of segregation.

Men created ghettos and concentration camps in Europe,
Keeping the holy from the damned, a form of segregation.

South Africa for years created “home lands” by constitution,
Keeping whites “safe” from “Bantu”, brutal, a form of segregation.

Now Bastet observes our modern age and sees that god is profit.
Subtle our enlightened age but still a form of segregation.

@)—>—>—

I tried the Ghazal again…however, it still comes out somber. So be it.  I did however find an interesting site which by clicking HERE you can see an illustrated how to in writing a Ghazal.  I discovered that the repeated phrase or word is called a radif and the last word of the first line that rhymes with the radif is called a qaafiya.  Each couplet is a stand alone poem and there’s no need to have them “tell a story”.  Each couplet has to have the same number of syllables in each line.

6 thoughts on “Ghazal: Fences of Segregation

  1. This is indeed a very interesting form. It does appear to be a more somber style, but perhaps it depends on the radif that is chosen. Love the ideas that you capture in your ghazals and how you end your last couplet with something about Bastet. 🙂

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    • Ah…the ending with my pen name is part of Tradition! I’m thinkng I’ll write something about Rumi, he’s one of the greatest Ghazal writers in history. I’m glad you enjoyed, and at least in me it brings out the somber side of me. I think because it’s linked to my more somber past 😉

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  2. Pingback: Just a Note: August 26, 2013 | Bastet and Sekhmet

  3. Pingback: Hand in Hand (Ghazal) | Reowr

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