30 Days of Haiga – Catchin’ up – September 10, 2016

 

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Day 5:

Black Country road

out of the dark
leading homeward lies
the country road

© Gsk ‘16

Day 6

things don't get done

unwritten verse
words flow past and away
yet are not lost

© Gsk ‘16

Day 7

new wine

he drinks new wine
harvesting summer thoughts
as raindrops fall

© Gsk ‘16

Day 8

leaving-venice-bw-small

expectations –
the train crosses the Lagoon
as I leave Venice

© Gsk ‘16

Day 9

Mint Tea

day dreaming
in the secret garden
– mint tea and elves

© Gsk ‘16

Day 10

Dawn relections

each dew drop
a world of mist and light –
dawn reflections

© Gsk ‘16

These haiga were created for A 19 Planets Art Blog – 30 DOH (Days of Haiga) – today I’ve finished catching up.  I hope to now begin posting a haiga a day for Rick’s yearly challenge.  Bastet.

30 Days of Haiga- 4 haiga to catch up – September 8, 2016

I’ve been so busy I completely forgot that in September my dear friend Rick Daddario from “A 19 Planets Art Blog” hosts the 30 days of haiga challenge … so I’m very very late indeed!  In order to make up I’ll write four haiga today and four tomorrow using Rick’s prompts – then I will proceed as I always do … following my own inspirations … and I hope to see many participants this year!! 🙂

The first four prompts are the following:

  1. new moon 2. fire or campfire 3. wind or breeze 4. gold, golden or yellow

New Moon

silence echoes
under the new moon
summer is over

© Gsk ‘16

Fire

farewells
under the fire of sunset
returning home

© Gsk ‘16

Warm Breeze

last summer breeze
whispers warm promises
before the snows

© Gsk ‘16

Golden Silence

golden silence
in the old alleys
siesta time

© Gsk ‘16

https://19planets.wordpress.com/

Morning Haiku and Waka – Sunday – May 1, 2016

light and shadow haiga

morning chill
raindrops fall on these flowers
awaiting May warmth

laying in bed
listening to the raindrops
warm under the sheets
drifting in and out of sleep
so hard to leave my dreams

those chiming bells
echoing in this loneliness
their hollow call

© G.s.k. ‘16

Morning Haiku and Waka – April 28, 2016

the lonely swan haiga

alone –
a swan swims into view
flowers blossom

§§§§

cold morning walk
north wind freezes the blossoms
snow dusts the mountains

§§§§§§

on this spring morning
looking at the snowy mount
and cherry blossoms
turning brittle on the trees
still – the birds huddle
no song fills the morning air
grey clouds hang heavy
and the northern winds whistle
ringing the wind chimes
making the trees bow low
and then for a moment –
a single ray of sunshine
escaped through the clouds
a single blackbird
began to sing his spring song
in the herb garden
a new sprout raises its head
there’s no denying
life’s warmth is a breath away
just waiting to be perceived.

§§§§

the stone wall
behind this screen holds up
my red clay tiled roof
and the nest of two sparrows
hear them twitter happily

© G.s.k. ‘16

Morning Haiku and Waka – Using Karumi (Haiga) – April 27, 2016

Tourists and Locals Haiga

morning promenade
waddling off their breakfast
locals and tourists

© G.s.k. ‘16

Carpe Diem Tokubetsudesu #77 pickles (in the way of Basho) lost episode of March

Today Chèvrefeuille re-introduced the “karumi” writing technique.  Here’s what he has to say about it:

“Bashô developed this concept during his final travels in 1693. Karumi is perhaps one of the most important and least understood principles of haiku poetry. Karumi can best be described as “lightness,” or a sensation of spontaneity. In many ways, karumi is a principle rooted in the “spirit” of haiku, rather than a specific technique. Bashô taught his students to think of karumi as “looking at the bottom of a shallow stream”. When karumi is incorporated into haiku, there is often a sense of light humour or child-like wonderment at the cycles of the natural world. Many haiku using karumi are not fixed on external rules, but rather an unhindered expression of the poet’s thoughts or emotions. This does not mean that the poet forgets good structure; just that the rules of structure are used in a natural manner. In my opinion, karumi is “beyond” technique and comes when a poet has learned to internalize and use the principles of the art interchangeably.

In a way it brought me another idea. Traditionally, and especially in Edo Japan, women did not have the male privilege of expanding their horizons, so their truth or spirituality was often found in the mundane. Women tend to validate daily life and recognize that miracles exist within the mundane, which is the core of haiku.There were females who did compose haiku, which were called “kitchen-haiku” by literati, but these “kitchen-haiku” had all the simplicity and lightness of karumi … In a way Basho taught males to write like females, with more elegance and beauty, based on the mundane (simple) life of that time.

Shiba Sonome, a female haiku poet, learned about karumi from Basho: “Learn about a pine tree from a pine tree, and about a bamboo plant from a bamboo plant.”

The poet should detach the mind from his own self. Nevertheless, some people interpret the word ‘learn’ in their own ways and never really ‘learn’. ‘Learn’ means to enter into the object, perceive its delicate life, and feel its feeling, whereupon a poem forms itself. Even a poem that lucidly describes an object could not attain a true poetic sentiment unless it contains the feelings that spontaneously emerged out of the object. In such a poem the object and the poet’s self would remain forever separate, for it was composed by the poet’s personal self.

Basho also said, “In my view a good poem is one in which the form of the verse, and the joining of its two parts, seem light as a shallow river flowing over its sandy bed”.

That, then, is karumi: becoming as one with the object of your poem … experiencing what it means to be that object … feeling the life of the object … allowing the poem to flow from that feeling and that experience.”