Morning Haiku and Waka – Using Karumi (Haiga) – April 27, 2016

Tourists and Locals Haiga

morning promenade
waddling off their breakfast
locals and tourists

© G.s.k. ‘16

Carpe Diem Tokubetsudesu #77 pickles (in the way of Basho) lost episode of March

Today Chèvrefeuille re-introduced the “karumi” writing technique.  Here’s what he has to say about it:

“Bashô developed this concept during his final travels in 1693. Karumi is perhaps one of the most important and least understood principles of haiku poetry. Karumi can best be described as “lightness,” or a sensation of spontaneity. In many ways, karumi is a principle rooted in the “spirit” of haiku, rather than a specific technique. Bashô taught his students to think of karumi as “looking at the bottom of a shallow stream”. When karumi is incorporated into haiku, there is often a sense of light humour or child-like wonderment at the cycles of the natural world. Many haiku using karumi are not fixed on external rules, but rather an unhindered expression of the poet’s thoughts or emotions. This does not mean that the poet forgets good structure; just that the rules of structure are used in a natural manner. In my opinion, karumi is “beyond” technique and comes when a poet has learned to internalize and use the principles of the art interchangeably.

In a way it brought me another idea. Traditionally, and especially in Edo Japan, women did not have the male privilege of expanding their horizons, so their truth or spirituality was often found in the mundane. Women tend to validate daily life and recognize that miracles exist within the mundane, which is the core of haiku.There were females who did compose haiku, which were called “kitchen-haiku” by literati, but these “kitchen-haiku” had all the simplicity and lightness of karumi … In a way Basho taught males to write like females, with more elegance and beauty, based on the mundane (simple) life of that time.

Shiba Sonome, a female haiku poet, learned about karumi from Basho: “Learn about a pine tree from a pine tree, and about a bamboo plant from a bamboo plant.”

The poet should detach the mind from his own self. Nevertheless, some people interpret the word ‘learn’ in their own ways and never really ‘learn’. ‘Learn’ means to enter into the object, perceive its delicate life, and feel its feeling, whereupon a poem forms itself. Even a poem that lucidly describes an object could not attain a true poetic sentiment unless it contains the feelings that spontaneously emerged out of the object. In such a poem the object and the poet’s self would remain forever separate, for it was composed by the poet’s personal self.

Basho also said, “In my view a good poem is one in which the form of the verse, and the joining of its two parts, seem light as a shallow river flowing over its sandy bed”.

That, then, is karumi: becoming as one with the object of your poem … experiencing what it means to be that object … feeling the life of the object … allowing the poem to flow from that feeling and that experience.”

Carpe Diem Haiga – Spring in Arco – April 10 2016

Riuso Haiga_small

I was rather busy yesterday and never got around to publishing a post.  What was I doing?  Participating in our bi-annual community “giornata de ri-uso”:

Listener

Basically at the changing of the seasons – from summer to winter and winter to spring, our city council organizes a campaign to gather those objects and clothing that would often end up tossed out.  In the United States one might have a garage sale a practice that’s never caught on here.

Everything is brought to a pick-up point then the volunteers go through the stuff, dividing the good stuff from the trash.  We then distribute the stuff free of charge.  There are also activities for children in a close by separate area.

Here are a few more scenes:

Spring is on the way in Arco!  Ciao, Bastet.

Writing with Morikawa Kyoroku – March 12, 2016

Two haiku and a haiga by haiku master Morikawa Kyorroku – disciple of Basho (the biography is in the CDHK link found below):

akegata ya shiro wo torimaku kamo no koe

it is dawn
the castle surrounded
by quacking wild ducks

deep in the water,
softly moving his fins,
a carp, dreaming

© Morikawa Kyoroku

Now my attempts to write in the spirit of today’s poet:

morning light
the first blossoms of spring
bloom over-night

under the castle
sparrows clamber for breakfast
near the fountain

© G.s.k. ‘16

Rovereto camOrtopainted_haiga

Carpe Diem Special #201 Basho’s disciples: Morikawa Kyoroku’s “morning glories”

Matins – Haiga – February 16, 2016

matins haiga

 

 

wandering
in and out of shadows
matins are ringing

© G.s.k. ‘16

Matins: the monastic nighttime liturgy, ending at dawn, of the canonical hours. In the Roman Catholic pre-Vatican-II breviary, it is divided into three nocturns. The name “matins” originally referred to the morning office also known as lauds.  In the Latin based languages like French and Italian matin or mattino means morning.

NaHaiWriMo – Zig-Zag – February 13, 2016

Lone Bee Haiga

zigzagging
inebriated by spring
a lone bee

© G.s.k. ‘16

(The above photograph was really very nice even before I started to go wild.  I began to imagine what it would be like to be a bee (ah – uhm) who’d just woken up after a winter’s nap and to find the fields full of the delightful smells of spring.  I can’t imagine what the vision of a bee might be, or if their sense of smell influences what they see … so I just ripped loose with the colour and pretended that it be psychedelic !)