The Cuckoo – Troiku – April 27, 2016

above the roof-tops
looking for a mate and host
the cuckoo calls

above the roof-tops
the cuckoo flies like a hawk
small birds hide

looking for a mate and host
thief and Romeo
cuckoo – cuckoo

the cuckoo calls
lazily from dawn to dusk
through spring and summer

© G.s.k. ‘16

Carpe Diem Theme Week 3: Magnolia Blossoms, haiku by Soseki Natsume: episode 7

classical kigo hototogisu (cuckoo)

kaero to naka zu ni warae hototogisu

home…
laugh, not cry
cuckoo

© Soseki Natsume

naku nara ba mangetsu ni nake hototogisu

if you want to sing
sing under the full moon
cuckoo

© Soseki Natsume

Common cuckoo

Carpe Diem Theme Week (3) – Troiku – February 18, 2016

shadows

in an instant
the hills are gone – a bright light
intense darkness

in an instant
the passing of a life
illumination

the hills are gone – a bright light
all remembered
all understood

intense darkness
the wheel of Samsara turns
a new life is born

© G.s.k. ‘16

 

Carpe Diem Theme Week #1 episode 3 The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying Insight 2 “through the chinks comes the light”

Morning Haiku and Waka – January 4, 2016

Troiku – Grey Sky Paradox

less cold
a cloudy day cloaks the world
comforting grey warmth

less cold
when the clouds hang in the sky
not a cold clear day

a cloudy day cloaks the world
in the mountains – snow
in our valley tears

comforting grey warmth
clear blue skies freeze the earth
a paradox

© G.s.k. ‘16

Carpe Diem #890 Shoukan (less cold)

Seven Days of Christmas (4) – Troiku – December 21, 2015

wrapped in red
awaiting to be opened
a message of love

wrapped in red
bound with silver ribbon
his Christmas gift

awaiting to be opened
under the bright tree
a child’s first gift

a message of love
crafted in crayon and framed
more precious than gold

© G.s.k. ‘15

Carpe Diem Seven Days Before Christmas 2015 #4 presents

Narrow Road (10) – troiku – December 15, 2015

water

flowing or still
the mystery of water
element of life

flowing or still
in these dark winter nights
water reigns

the mystery of cool water
hidden in the mist
falling from the clouds

element of life
where does it flow from here
no one can tell

© G.s.k. ‘15

When I studied shiatsu  the theory of the five elements intrigued me. Take for instance, water.  Water represents fluidity, adaptation, the flowing and the formless things of the world.  It’s season is winter, it’s colour is black (or dark blue), beyond rivers, springs, lakes and rain, water includes plants because they adapt and grow according to where the sun shines and change with the seasons, blood and body fluids and sexual energy are also representative of water as are the emotions of adaptation, evolution and can be associated with defensiveness, flexibility, being subtle and charisma.  It is believed that living things are born with a fixed amount of “vital energy” or life – also represented by water and once consumed death takes place.

In the past the Japanese (as did the Chinese) believed that ejaculation consumed the male’s vital energy, so he was encouraged to learn how not to ejaculate (or conserve his seed) in order to preserve his vital energy as long as possible and avoid precocious ageing, although sexuality was and is encouraged at the same time  because it is considered to be one of the most potent of cures known to mankind for a myriad of ailments.  Women, whose sexual body fluids are retained within them are considered luckier than men for this very fact and it is believed that women live longer than men for precisely this reason.

Carpe Diem #880 secrets unveiled of the Deep North: coolness, cloud peaks, not permitted to tell

As I was still descending, I saw an old smithy built right on a trickling stream. According to my guide, this was where Gassan, a local swordsmith, used to make his swords, tempering them in the crystal-clear water of the stream. He made his swords with such skill and devotion that they became famous throughout the world. He must have chosen this particular spot for his smithy probably because he knew of a certain mysterious power latent in the water, just as indeed a similar power is known to have existed in the water of Ryosen Spring in China. Nor is the story of Kansho and Bakuya out of place here, for it also teaches us that no matter where your interest lies, you will not be able to accomplish anything unless you bring your deepest devotion to it. As I sat reflecting thus upon a rock, I saw in front of me a cherry tree hardly three feet tall just beginning to blossom – far behind the season of course, but victorious against the heavy weight of snow which it had resisted for more than half a year. I immediately thought of the famous Chinese poem about ‘the plum tree fragrant in the blazing heat of summer’ and of an equally pathetic poem by the priest Gyoson, and felt even more attached to the cherry tree in front of me. I saw many other things of interest in this mountain, the details of which, however, I refrain from betraying in accordance with the rules I must obey as a pilgrim. When I returned to my lodging, my host, Egaku, asked me to put down in verse some impressions of my pilgrimage to the three mountains, so I wrote as follows on the narrow strips of writing paper he had given me.

coolness
a crescent moon faintly seen
over Black feather Mountain

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

cloud peaks
how many have crumbled
on the mountain of the moon

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

not permitted to tell
how sleeves are wetted
in the bathroom
 

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

 

The Narrow Road (3) – Troiku – December 6, 2015

The narrow road

on the road – illness
cold wind howls and blast of rain
warm light beacons

on the road – illness
lonely thoughts of passing on
as darkness thickens

cold wind howls and blast of rain
drown the morning sun
the willows bow

warm light beacons
from the windows of an inn
welcome haven

© G.s.k. ‘15

 

 

Carpe Diem #873 Deeper into the North: men of this world; picking up rice seedlings; backpack and sword

Today’s troiku was inspired by this extract:

I stopped overnight at Iizuka. I had a bath in a hot spring before I took shelter at an inn. It was a filthy place with rough straw mats spread out on an earth floor. They had to prepare my bed by the dim light of the fire, for there was not even a lamp in the whole house. A storm came upon us towards midnight, and between the noise of the thunder and leaking rain and the raids of mosquitoes and fleas, I could not get a wink of sleep. Furthermore, an attack of my old complaint made me so ill that I suffered severely from repeated attacks while I rode on horseback bound for the town of Kori. It was indeed a terrible thing to be so ill on the road, when there still remained thousands of miles before me, but thinking that if I were to die on my way to the extreme north it would only be the fulfillment of providence, I trod the earth as firmly as possible and arrived at the barrier-gate of Okido in the province of Date.

© Basho in The Narrow Road To The Deep North 

Morning Haiku and Waka – Autumn Reflections – December 5, 2015

foggy courtyard birch

the last days of fall
just a single yellow leaf 
in gathering fog

the last days of fall
coloured leaves cover the ground
grey foggy mornings

just a single yellow leaf
clings to the birch
in dawn’s early light

in gathering fog
harbingers of winter call
gathering silence

© G.s.k. ‘15

Carpe Diem Special #185 Georgia’s first “Autumn Reflections” (Troiku)

I’m honoured to be hosted this month on Carpe Diem Special with my haiku and waka, thanks to my haiku for the autumn kukai “Peace of Mind” which won first place in October.  First prize is the publication of an e-book of verse (and a weekly presentation of my work throughout the month of December).

I’ve spent many days this month composing poetry and reflections on inner peace for the book which will shortly be published and it has been a cathartic experience coming as it did upon a particularly difficult moment of my life.

When Chèvrefeuille asked me if I preferred any particular poem to be used this month I replied that I didn’t and would be pleased if he chose what to show, that way it would be a surprise for me.  I write many poems … and rarely re-read those poems.  Reading today’s post and Chèvrefeuille’s choice therefore, was like reading a troiku written by someone else.  I was surprised.

   autumn reflections
as I cross the sun warmed bridge
geese fly south

autumn reflections
old man contemplates winter
under the hot sun

as I cross the sun warmed bridge
ducks laugh downstream
– diving for trout

geese fly south
the noisy swallows have gone
but the blackbird sings

© Georgia

Carpe Diem Haiku Kai – Flying Deer (Troiku) – November 29, 2015

Sarca Valley

autumn morning
the flight of his soul
with the flying deer

autumn morning
golden trees and sunshine
the Sarca Valley

the flight of his soul
begins its journey
into the Tao

with the flying deer
beyond this mortal coil
eternal freedom

© G.s.k. ‘15

 […] Then … my heart misses a heart beat. In front of me tumble a lot of little creatures, monkey like, in a dark universe of solidified magma. I forget to breath … I see a huge flying deer with antlers of spiraling curls and legs elegantly floating through the skies. This magnificent animal escaping from two reaching hands, is three thousand years ago made by humans from the Bronze Age. The half-open mouth is from a goose, symbol of the soul; its flight is pointing to the universe, maybe its a symbol of the transformation of the soul that rises to Heaven after dead. … And the “flying deer” is one of the deities who are pointing us the way, teach us the way to let go and accept life as it is.” […]        Chèvrefeuille an astral voyage

flying deer
points towards the after-life
true acceptation

© Chèvrefeuille

cry of an eagle
reaches the ears of the flying deer
listen to nature

© Chèvrefeuille

Carpe Diem #868 Stag Beetle / Flying Deer

Nature’s Library – Troiku – November 24, 2015

fall leaves

laying on the lawn
shrivelled tattered sodden leaves
nature’s library

laying on the lawn
the clouds pass over head
illusive beasts

shrivelled tattered and sodded leaves
after the tempest
an autumn carpet

nature’s library
stories to be read and learnt
silent reflections

© G.s.k. ‘15

 Carpe Diem #865 torn apart book (reading nature)

Morning Haiku and Waka – Throat singers – November 15, 2015

city streets

from her soul
the sounds of the city beats
in healing tones

from her soul
at one with life – harmony
the sound of life

each day passes
the sounds of the city beats
rising and falling

a shaman’s song
reaching across barriers
in healing tones

© G.s.k. ‘15

Carpe Diem #858 Throat Songs of the Steppes