Ten Styles of Tanka – Post 6 – January 25, 2016

Malcesine Gull_small

the old gull
sitting on the ancient pylon
silently waits
the sun plays hide and seek
in the gathering clouds

G.s.k. ‘16

  1. Visual description – miru tei

“This is a rather bland style emphasising visual description and imagery and often containing no subjective or emotive statements. Some of the decedents of Teika, such as his son Tameie, used this style or technique to counteract the strong subjective vein of the “Fujiwara style”. In the Teika Jittei are 12 examples of this style among which is this poem by Minamoto Tsunenobu (1016-1097) written on the subject of “young rice shoots” as published in Shikokinshū, #3:225:

sanae toru / yamado no kakehi / morinikeri / hiku shimenawa ne / tsuyu zo koboruru

the water pipe
leading into mountain fields
must be leaking
moisture drips down sacred ropes
around the beds of rice

It seems Shiki’s shasei style of “sketching” in haiku would be a carry-over from this tanka technique.”

 

Carpe Diem Tokubetsudesu #66 Teika’s Ten Tanka Techniques by Jane Reichhold

Atman Depression – Tanka – April 5, 2015

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAcreation
accepting life’s burden
mother and wife
from the flower of life
realization of self

© G.s.k. 15

At Murano, there is a large glass sculpture of a woman … reading Chèvefeuille’s description of Krishna’s lesson to Arjuna about the perfect creature of creation, this came to mind!

Such a person, Krishna tells him, will have no desires at all. Since he is content within, having realized the Self, he is entirely free from desires. The consciousness of the Atman and abandonment of desires are simultaneous experiences. The various qualities of a Sthitaprajna (a stable-minded person) are described by the Lord. He will not be affected by adversity and will have no fear or anger. He will take things as they come, and will not have any likes and dislikes. He will neither hug the world nor hate it. The man of stable mind will have perfect control of the senses. The senses are powerful and draw the mind outwards. One should therefore turn one’s gaze within and realize God who resides in the heart. The Yogi, having achieved a stable mind, remains steadfast even though all sense-objects come to him. He is unmoved and lives a life of eternal peace.