Carpe Diem Haiga – Spring in Arco – April 10 2016

Riuso Haiga_small

I was rather busy yesterday and never got around to publishing a post.  What was I doing?  Participating in our bi-annual community “giornata de ri-uso”:

Listener

Basically at the changing of the seasons – from summer to winter and winter to spring, our city council organizes a campaign to gather those objects and clothing that would often end up tossed out.  In the United States one might have a garage sale a practice that’s never caught on here.

Everything is brought to a pick-up point then the volunteers go through the stuff, dividing the good stuff from the trash.  We then distribute the stuff free of charge.  There are also activities for children in a close by separate area.

Here are a few more scenes:

Spring is on the way in Arco!  Ciao, Bastet.

Puns – Haibun – March 15, 2016

I’ve been labouring over a prompt for days, trying to figure out what to write a pun in haiku form about.  Today, March 15, a fellow blogger Jules Paige, sent me an interesting bit of information about how the Romans read their calendar … which included the famous Ides of the year … which were supposed to be determined by the full moons at mid-month which usually fell around the thirteenth of the month except for March, May, July and October when they fell on the fifteenth.

the Ides of March
taunted the seer said:
remains to be seen

© G.s.k. ‘16

°°°°°°°°°

the year’s first snowfall
the cat bats at the window
to catch the snow birds.

each suburban lawn
a page in fall’s manuscript
burnished with gold leaves.

pierced by falcon claws
red feathers on the white snow
a cardinal sin.

 

Carpe Diem #937 Robe

“Japanese poets were master punsters. We have many of the same opposrtunities for puns in English, but contemporary haiku writers may not be as well versed as the Japanese are in using this technique because there have been periods of Western literary history when this skill has been reviled. And even though the hai of haiku means “joke, or fun, or unusual”, there are still writers who frown when they encounter a pun in three lines. Basho didn’t use the technique much because he was against the overuse of the method by the two other haikai schools of his time. Translators shy away from pun verses because they rarely work in the target language and long explanations can be tiresome to write and read. Fortunately the above haiku by Basho, works in both languages.” By Chèvrefeuille

Narrowing The Focus – Haiku Writing Techniques – March 10, 2016

wet grass

wet grass

in the courtyard
under the persimmon tree
rain drops on grass

in Padua
the winter gardens glisten
icy rain drops

© G.s.k. ‘16

 

Carpe Diem #934 Onions

“a morning of snow
only the onions in the garden
blaze the trail

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold

This Haiku Writing Technique is called Narrowing The Focus and  was often  used by Yosa Buson (1716-1784)) because, he as an artist, a painter, was a very visual person. Basho and earlier poets were completely comfortable in using this haiku writing technique.
The above poem starts basically with a wide-angle lens on the world in the 1st line, then switches to a normal lens for the 2nd line and zooms in for a close up in the end. The technique sounds simple, and when done well it’s very effective in bringing the reader’s attention down to one basic element or fact of the haiku.

Other examples by Basho:

old village
not a house without
a persimmon tree

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

a grassy plain
the moon is a young sprout
from Pine Island seed

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)”

Rain – Haiku Writing Techniques – March 9, 2016

rain rooftops

last rains of winter
raindrops tip-tap on the roof
and on window panes

grey winter days
looking at the rain fall
cold wet memories

students and workers
riding through the town on bikes
under cold rainfall

§§§

watching the rain fall
counting the days until spring
discarding winter
and yet the mountains are white
with late snowfall

endless rainfall
smell of mould and cabbages
waft through the air
greeting the weary visitors
in the ancient farm-house

© G.s.k. ‘16

Carpe Diem #933 Rain

First a look at Shiki:

You’ll often read that haiku shouldn’t  be describing a scene – one is to look for that “a-ha!” quality that will have our reader touch upon a sort of surprised moment creating a sensation of some inner meaning.  However, in modern haiku, Masoaoka Shiki  felt that haiku had become trite, dusty and “contrived” with all its artificial rules and puns accumulated  from the old renga schools.   Shiki, like other Meiji Period writers truly enjoyed the realism of Western literature, and this is evident in his approach and recommended composition form based on Shasei (“realistic observation of nature”) or sketch from life which he interjected into his prose writing, haiku and tanka  as his principal style.

A lightning flash:
between the forest trees
I have seen water.

But this month we walk with Basho … so here is a quote from today’s episode at CDHK:

“In the way of Basho:

a rainy day
the autumn world
of a border town

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold

In this haiku Basho uses the so-called “sketch” or “shasei” technique. Though this technique is often given Shiki’s term “shasei” or “shajitsu” it’s not really a technique which is invented by Shiki. This technique has been in use since the beginning of poetry in Asia. The poetic principle is “to depict the thing just as it is”. There are some inspirations for haiku that are best said as simply as possible. Shiki wrote his haiku almost all with this “shasei”, but Shiki realized himself in 1893 that the overuse of this technique could produce many lackluster haiku, so it should never be the only method employed in a haiku.

early autumn
the sea and rice fields
one green

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold

(There are many more examples of Basho’s poetry on today’s post so click the link)

Morning Haiku and Waka – Basho’s Writing Techniques – March 6, 2016

swinging bridge
first one thinks of
meeting horses

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

“This haiku was written in autumn 1688 and is about a bridge in Kiso. The Kiso area was known for high quality horses raised there on August 15th it was the customary for the emperor to inspect his horses. All the horses from this district had to cross this bridge to go to Tokyo.

Due to his renga-writing skills. Basho was a master at making wild, wide leaps in the linking of the images in his poems. Today the haiku writing technique used by Basho is Leap Linkage.  In this haiku the linkage leap is so wide that a footnote of explanation for readers four centuries and thousands of miles away to follow it is needed. This is one of the problems of making an innovative or wide leap – how to get the reader’s mind to track it over the abyss without getting lost. The important point in creating with this technique is that the writer is Always totally aware of his or her truth. This is rare in haiku, because in haiku the poet needs the reader. Usually, if the reader thinks about the words long enough and deeply enough, he can find the author’s truth, or better still, a new one.” (CDHK)

§§§§

This is my attempt for the leap linkage technique:

coloured fenced city_small

On New Year’s day I was invited by a friend to go on a walk.  We climbed up a steep hill-side to a metal cross that over-looks the lower Sarca valley.  Being completely out of shape the only thing that kept me walking was the spectacular photographs that I’d have been able to take.  Unfortunately my camera’s batteries died after the third or fourth photo.  I admit to being terribly disappointed.  Later returning to her car at sunset I took a few photographs with my telephone. The above is one of them.

fenced in
a teasing purple sunset
New Year’s day

© G.s.k. ‘16

§§§§§§§§

(In Western haiku we learn that rhyme has no part of the form … which like many other rules of Western haiku has little to do with the reality of Japanese haiku. Let’s read what Chèvrefeuille tells you in this episode of CDHK dedicated to haiku writing techniques of Master Basho.)

nebu no ki no hagoshi mo itoe hoshi no kage

a silk tree
even through the leaves waery
of starlight

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

In the way of Basho

“Rhyme is a major component of Western poetry. In Japan most of the sound units (onji) are built on only five vowels, and rhyming occurs naturally. Yet, haiku translated into rhymed lines often need so much padding to make the rhyme work that the simplicity of the poem gets lost. However, if the reader takes the time to read the romaji version of the above haiku by Basho. one can see how often the old master employed the linkage of sound in his work. The rhyme, in the above haiku, occurs here with hagoshi(“through leaves”), hoshi (“star”), and the seven “oh” sounds.” (CDHK)

(So we must conclude that the problem is not writing rhyming haiku, but translating Japanese haiku which is often rhymed but untranslatable as a rhyming poem in western languages if we wish to keep the haiku poetic/aesthetic form.)

My attempt at haiku rhyme:

bikes_2

inside city walls
without stalls metal horses
line Padua’s malls

© G.s.k. ‘16

(As Chèvrefeuille would say, not  very strong haiku today … perhaps I’ll try these techniques sometime again in the future 😉 )

 

Carpe Diem #931 Bridge and Carpe Diem #932 silk tree

Hello!

As many might have remarked, I’ve not been as assiduously writing as I usually do.  This is not due to any lack of enthusiasm, but shoddy Internet.  It takes forever for a single page to come up on my browser if there is a connection at all, which is becoming terribly frustrating.  So this post will be in fact a response to two prompted themes bridge and silk tree from Carpe Diem Haiku Kai.

Mirror – Basho’s Thoughts – March 4, 2016

Padua

Padua

at its centre
pulsates the heart of history
our modernity
reflections of the past
envisioned in daily life

reflection ..
history wherever one looks
in Italy

© G.s.k. ‘16

§§§§§§§

 

 

“This month we are exploring Basho’s way of writing haiku … we walk his path with its many different haiku writing techniques. Some of those haiku writing techniques came along here in our special feature “Carpe Diem Haiku Writing Techniques” and some didn’t. As for today’s episode mirror … its one of the haiku writing techniques which came along in the first series of CD-HWT last year.

rabbit-ear iris
how much it looks like
its image in water

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

In this haiku Basho uses the technique of comparison. This technique is very close to the technique of association, which we had in our first regular episode of this month, that it may seem they are the same. There is, however, a slight / vital difference. All comparisons are associations, but not all associations are comparative. The above haiku by Basho is a great example of this technique and this idea.

In the words of Betty Drevniok:

“In haiku the SOMETHING and the SOMETHING ELSE are set down together in clearly stated images. Together they complete and fulfill each other as ONE PARTICULAR EVENT.”

She rather leaves the reader to understand that the idea of comparison is showing how two different things are similar or share similar aspects.”

Carpe Diem #930 mirror

Nature – Morning Haiku and Waka – February 26, 2016

Winter sunset

adieu
the passing of the day
painted passions

in this early spring
the mad painter portrays
his lover’s heart
splashing paint upon the sky
it dribbles down the canvas

she sang at dawn
by nightfall she was weary
red sunset

§§§§§

[nature]
he tried to put her into a box
she slipped through a crack

[nature]
so many definitions
no understanding

he tried to put her into a box
in 5 by 10 photos
mostly black and white

she slipped through a crack
spreading light across the sky
defeating darkness

© G.s.k. ‘16

Carpe Diem #926 Nature

Carpe Diem: Death as Peace of Mind – Tanka – February 20, 2016

Eternal Voyage

in a morning
yet unknown and yet unseen
my voyage ends
before me the universe
behind me the world

© G.s.k. ‘16

Carpe Diem Theme Week #1 episode 4: The Tibetan Book of Living and Dying: Insight 3 “thinking about death gives life meaning”

Introduction

finding peace of mind
the soothing sound of rippling water
the rustling of leaves
strengthens my tired mind
that’s fortitude
deep inner peace, the beating of my heart,
the music of life
caught in the rippling stream –
finding peace of mind

© Chèvrefeuille

Bitter Sweetness – Haiku – February 6, 2016

99-chocolate

in my mouth
slowly bitter chocolate melts
sweet reflections

© G.s.k. ‘16

Carpe Diem #910 Bitterness/Sour

I found the photograph on this fantastically wicked post about a thing called a Ktarian Chocolate Puff … Don’t even go near this post if you’re diabetic or a chocoholic … and for pities sake if you’re on a diet!  The blog is called: BANANAMONDAES:  Cooking and eating through the stacks of children’s literature – The post is:  KTARIAN CHOCOLATE PUFF it was published in 2011.