Out of a washbowl – Tan Renga – August 15, 2015

Vintage Rustic Pewter Pitcher And Wash Bowl

Out of the washbowl
I scoop up,
my distorted face

© Sumitaku Kenshin (1961-1987)

those concentric circles
move towards infinity

© G.s.k. ‘15

 

 

Written for:

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge #96 Sumitaku Kenshin’s out of the washbowl

In today’s feature we met a new, modern haiku poet, who unfortunately left this world after only 26 years.  To read his biography, click on the above link.

Tan Renga Challenge #95 “lilies of the valley” by Adjei Agyei Baah – August 1, 2015

lilies-of-the-valley
stuck to the mountainside
like ribbons

(c) Adjei Agyei Baah

birthday gifts from creation
opened and forgotten

© G.s.k. ‘15

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge #95 “lilies of the valley” by Adjei Agyei Baah

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge #94 – July 17, 2015

after my walk:
a perfect spiderweb
stuck to my glasses

© Lee Gurga

unlike the lowly fly
I lived to tell the tale

intricate patterns
are pasted on my lenses
like shattered glass

© G.s.k. ‘15

Written for:

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge #94 Lee Gurga’s “a perfect spider web”

Tan Renga – Yu Chang’s Warm Rain – July 11, 2015

warm rain
the spring moon returns
to the rusty can

©Yu Chang

reflecting off the water
shimmering moon light

in the water can
warm spring rain drops fall
summer collection

G.s.k. ‘15

Written for: Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge #93 Yu Chang’s Warm Rain 

Today’s haiku author is Yu Chang, “a modern American haiku poet. Yu Chang was born in mainland China; grew up in Taiwan; and went to graduate schools in England and in the US. Since 1974 he has been a faculty member in the electrical engineering department at Union College in Schenectady, NY.”

Chiyo-Ni’s “Morning glory” – Tan Renga – July 4, 2015

Chiyo-ni standing beside a well. This woodcut by Utagawa Kuniyoshi illustrates her most famous haiku: finding a bucket entangled in the vines of a morning glory, she will go ask for water rather than disturb the flower.

Chiyo-ni standing beside a well. This woodcut by Utagawa Kuniyoshi illustrates her most famous haiku: finding a bucket entangled in the vines of a morning-glory, she will go ask for water rather than disturb the flower.

asano eikou yoku baketto entanguru watashiha mizuwo motomeru

morning-glory!
the well bucket-entangled,
I ask for water

© Chiyo-Ni

all life is precious
even the morning-glory

old farmer
disentangles the bucket
each petal intact

warm tea in the morning
from morning-glory well

© G.s.k. ‘15

Written for:

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge #92, Chiyo-Ni’s “Morning glory”

The print was uploaded onto Wikipedia by Petrusbarbygere

Tan Renga – “boiled rice slop” – June 27, 2015

[…] “1694-summer. Basho uses less than elegant terms to describe both the rice dish and the man’s wife. Notice how the sense varies as the second line twists so that there are two meanings. This is what Basho considered “lightness” or karumi.” […]

meshi angu kaka ga chiso ya yu suzumi

boiled rice slop
his old lady fans the treat
with evening coolness

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

Humour and lightness are particular to one’s culture.  If you’ve ever travelled you would have soon realized that what you might find humorous and indeed a light comment, goes over like a lead balloon … and you might just find yourself, mentally, scratching your head to figure out what everyone is laughing about when someone cracks a “joke”.  Here Basho shows us an aspect of lightness or karumi, 17th Japanese style!

Daifuku

boiled rice slop
his old lady fans the treat
with evening coolness

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold

making sweet confections
she presents a summer feast

downing warm sake
under June’s  shimmering  moon
topped with daifuku

his old lady’s rice slop
inspires happy renga

© G.s.k. ‘15

For:

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge #91, Basho’s boiled rice slop

On the Porch – Tan Renga – June 24, 2015

on the porch
in my shorts;
auto lights in the rain

© Allen Ginsberg (1955)

 puddles splashed with light
here – standing stunned as a doe

© G.s.k. ‘15

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge #90, Allen Ginsberg’s “on the porch”

More haiku by Allen Ginsberg:

Looking over my shoulder
my behind was covered
with cherry blossoms.

I didn’t know the names
of the flowers—now
my garden is gone.

I slapped the mosquito
and missed.
What made me do that?

© Allen Ginsberg

Allen Ginsberg inspired by Basho:

a mosquito
aiming noisily –
the sound of one hand

© Basho (?)

A frog floating
in the drugstore jar:
summer rain on gray pavements.

On the porch
in my shorts;
auto lights in the rain.

Another year
has past—the world
is no different.

The first thing I looked for
in my old garden was
The Cherry Tree.

© Allen Ginsberg

Our host’s renga:

on the porch
in my shorts;
auto lights in the rain
                            (Allen Ginsberg)
after a lonely … hot day
lips on mine … together again
              (Chèvrefeuille)

Carpe Diem Tan Renga Challenge #89, Southard’s “from deep in the spring” – June 13, 2015

From deep in the spring
clear reflections rise to meet
 falling plum petals
© Mabson O. Southard
§§§

an old carp circles slowly
under the clear reflections

§§§
 a dragon-fly lands
upon the crystal surface
among plum petals

© G.s.k. ‘15

Tan Renga – Basho’s “for the Star Festival” – May 30, 2015

long distance

Tanabata no awanu kokoro ya uchuten

for the Star Festival
even when hearts cannot meet
rainy-rapture

© Basho (Tr. Jane Reichhold)

hands close to touching
lips infinite miles apart

she weaves her dreams
reflecting on her crow herder
awaiting his return

© G.s.k. 15

§§§§§§§§§§§§

“On the seventh day of the seventh month, now celebrated on July 7, is Tanabata (“Star Festival”). This is the night once a year when the crow herder, the star Altair, crosses the Milky Way on a bridge of magpie wings to meet the weaver-girl, Vega, for a night of celestial love-making. On a summer night, considered by the Japanese as the beginning of autumn, in this hemisphere, these are the two brightest stars seen directly overhead. If it rains the lovers cannot meet. Traditionally, on this evening people gather for outdoor picnics. Children of all ages make wishes by writing them on strips of paper to be tied on bamboo bushes. The word uchuten is a compound word made by Basho incorporating “rain in the middle of heaven” and “ecstasy.””  Chèvrefeuille

Linked to Carpe Diem Haiku Kai – Tan Renga