In a wind storm – Ghazal – April 9, 2015

Photo Credits: Kimerajam

Photo Credits: Kimerajam

She seeks butterflies in a wind storm
Lost in her own world in a wind storm.

In books and dreams she walks ever alone
Stumbling past obstacles in a wind storm.

Fragile and lonely unaware of what’s real
She walks blindly and sadly in a wind storm.

Birds cannot fly in this stormy blow
How can she walk on in a wind storm?

The world is crashing around her ears and yet
She seems not to notice she’s in a wind storm.

Sekhmet looks on this weary scene aghast
Wondering when she’ll see she’s in a wind storm.

© G.s.k. ‘15

MLMM – Photo Challenge – and – B&P’s Shadorma and Beyond

How does one write a Ghazal:

1. Every verse is a 2-line couplet, (unless you’re Robert Bly) with around 4 to 15 couplets in total.
2. Each line must contain the same number of syllables (in Arabic, they must be the same length we use syllables).
3. Every couplet ends in the same word(s) preceded by a rhyme.
The same repeating word(s) is/are called a radif, and the rhyme is called a qaafiya.
4. In the first couplet, both lines end with a qaafiya (rhyme) and radif (repeating word(s)).
5. Each verse is considered a separate mini-poem, so there is no need for any connection between couplets.
6. The last verse is traditionally a signature couplet in which you include your first or last name (or pen name).

Traditionally the preferred subject of a Ghazal is love …. though in our modern age it’s used for just about any subject.